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HCG for Weight Loss – Practitioners Should Know Better


Posted on July 9th, 2009 by Matt Schoeneberger

Today, I got an email from a practitioner I respect announcing the use of HCG in their facility. The message touted all the usual HCG nonsense; re-setting the hypothalamus, three kinds of fat… all the stuff straight out of Simeons’ and Trudeau’s books. Here’s a quote from the email:

“The third type of fat is the abnormal Secure Fat Reserve. This third fat is also a reserve of fuel, but unlike the normal, readily accessible fat reserves spread throughout the body, this fat is located in what is called the “problem areas” and is virtually inaccessible.”

Fat around these areas is not virtually inaccessible. They just tend to be the places the body preferentially stores fat, and this is regulated by the difference in hormones between sexes.(Power) Continue losing weight and it will come off these areas eventually.

What about the fact that stored fat in the hip area is correlated with good health? Yup, that’s right. Here’s an excerpt from our upcoming weight loss ebook:

“…larger hip and thigh measurements, commonly due to subcutaneous fat, are negatively associated with increased health risks. (Janssen) This means your risk goes down.”

One more thing.  Promoters of the HCG diet commonly take text straight from Simeons’ book, written far too long ago.  Can they at least update it with the current vocabulary?  Maybe mention visceral fat and subcutaneous fat instead of structural fat and the fat reserve?  The HCG diet and nearly everything I’ve seen written that promotes it is just plain nonsense.

Please, read our HCG report and pass it on to as many people as possible.

Hey! HCG Promoters! Look Here! This is what real research looks like:

Power MP, Schulkin J. Sex differences in fat storage, fat metabolism, and the health risks from
obesity: possible evolutionary origins. Br J Nutr. 2008;99:931–940

Janssen, I. et al (2004). Waist circumference and not body mass index explains obesity-related health risks. American J Clinical Nutrition; 79: 379-384.

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